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January 25, 2019

In this week's "Four Minute Foreign Policy" interview, Johns Hopkins SAIS Foreign Policy Institute is pleased to introduce Fellow Shamila Chaudhary, Senior Advisor to Dean Vali Nasr and former Director for Pakistan and Afghanistan on the U.S. National Security Council.

What impedes the path forward for the United States and Pakistan - and with what consequences for Afghanistan's future? What opportunities does the United States' leadership have to better engage and pursue mutually beneficial goal...

September 8, 2018

As he boarded his flight to Pakistan earlier this week, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo explained the purpose of his visit: "New leader there, wanted to get out there at the beginning of his time in an effort to reset the relationship between the two countries."

There is plenty to reset. Relations between the U.S. and Pakistan are badly strained. And while it would be unrealistic to expect the two countries to start completely anew overnight, by the end of Pompeo's brief visit on Wednesday, he and...

For those watching the results of Pakistan’s elections from the U.S., the parallels were striking. A wealthy sports icon turned politician who constantly reminds the country’s elite they don’t know the real Pakistan, Imran Khan’s rise to power is a replay of America’s 2016 reckoning with Donald Trump and the anti-establishment wave he rode to the White House. Read more.

The Pakistani people have spoken. In Wednesday's parliamentary elections, they voted in Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaaf (PTI), a political party led by former cricket star turned politician Imran Khan, to form the next government. PTI will most likely install Khan as the prime minister.

But have the Pakistani people told us what they want? We can't be sure, and here's why: The campaign environment leading up to the elections was heavily manipulated by pro-PTI forces, namely members of the military, jud...

February 13, 2018

Shamila Chaudhary, director for Pakistan and Afghanistan at the National Security Council under former President Barack Obama, said the Pakistani defense minister is likely interpreting the statement correctly.

“It’s not a misreading. That’s exactly how anyone would interpret it,” Chaudhary told VOA. “This suggests they might change the rules to apprehend insurgents” across the border in Pakistan.

...

Continue reading at Pakistan Observer

February 1, 2018

Shamila Chaudhary, director for Pakistan and Afghanistan at the National Security Council under former President Barack Obama, said the Pakistani defense minister is likely interpreting the statement correctly.

"It's not a misreading. That's exactly how anyone would interpret it," Chaudhary told VOA. "This suggests they might change the rules to apprehend insurgents" across the border in Pakistan.

...

Continue reading at Voice of America

Pakistani officials are “going to become much more forceful in terms of their rhetoric towards the United States, especially because there's an election coming up, probably in May,” said Shamila Chaudhary of the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies, in an interview with Slate's Isaac Chotiner. “They're going to double down on their kind of anti-U.S. sentiment, and they're going to focus on their relationship with China.”

...

Continue reading at The Washington Post

“If Trump wants to increase troop levels, I’m not sure he can engage in this back-and-forth with Pakistan,” said Shamila N. Chaudhary, who served as Pakistan director on the National Security Council during the Obama administration. “They’re going to need those routes.”

...

Continue reading at LA Times

Isaac Chotiner: This move of the Trump administration has already proven controversial, but what’s actually the argument against it given Pakistan’s behavior?

Shamila N. Chaudhary: Giving Pakistan military aid is a tool that Americans have used to get access to the military. It’s not aid just for the things that they need to buy with it. It’s really a tool that gained us access to have an audience with the Pakistani military, and we used that audience to send more U.S. military officials to be em...

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