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It has only been a few days since the New Year fireworks lit up the skies of many of the world’s cities. For a brief moment, it was possible to forget the tumult and flurry of activity that marked the end of 2018, and focus on the festivities.


Unfortunately, not even the arrival of a new year is likely to aid any efforts to temper rising volatility, fractious diplomacy, political headwinds, tepid markets and, generally speaking, a world on the brink. Regardless of the causes of the alarming deve...

An unmistakable sense of despair and gloom accompanies most news reports and literature on the state of affairs in Libya after 2011. The Arab Spring was meant to usher in a period of unprecedented change after decades of notoriously undemocratic leadership across the Middle East and North Africa. Yet, seven years later, there has been very little positive development in terms of transparency, accountability, and inclusivity in the Arab world. No Arab Spring country, however, has fared worse than...

Few people in Washington are as knowledgeable about Libya as Jonathan Winer, who was the United States special envoy to the country from 2013 to 2017. He is also a former deputy assistant secretary of state and was counsel to senator John Kerry, later secretary of state.

What has happened there before? What is happening now? Where might it all be heading? Winer knows.

We start with the fact that US President Barack Obama, in 2011, was not keen to join the call for action in Libya because he did no...

January 26, 2015

This is a repost from www.fpri.org.

“I am a very old man, and I have lived through almost the entire century,” wrote Isaiah Berlin in his 1994 essay, “A Message to the 21st Century.”[1] The 85-year old British political philosopher looked back at the carnage of the previous decades, and forward to the promise of a new millennium. The crimes of Genghis Khan “pale into insignificance next to the Russian Revolution and its aftermath: the oppression, torture, murder that can be laid at the doors of L...

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