Art of Diplomacy Lecture Series

 

Since 2015, the Foreign Policy Institute (FPI) has held a series of speaking events with distinguished speakers and accompanying commentators from SAIS faculty or FPI Fellows. The events have been, and will continue to be, unique in that they are organized into a coherent series whereby attendees will gain an understanding of several different aspects of the diplomatic field from interviewers helping the speakers to draw out lessons learned from their careers.

 

Our objective is to increase SAIS students’ understanding of modern diplomacy as an art by exposing them to recent and current practitioners. We want to teach students how modern diplomacy is conducted, what the challenges that speakers have faced are, and how they used diplomacy tactics to approach them.

 

 

Previous session themes

Us vs. Them: The Failure of Globalism with Ian Bremmer

​Date: September 14, 2018

Location: Washington, DC

Speaker: Ian Bremmer, president and founder of Eurasia Group and GZERO Media​

Why does populism continue to spread across the globe? Why have so many actors come to understand the world as a battle between "us" and "them"? How will people define the threats - real and imagined - as fights for survival, and with what consequences? How will governments react - and ultimately, what can we do about it?

Congressional Diplomacy: An Indirect Role in American Foreign Policy

  • Date: February 21, 2018
  • Location: Washington, DC
  • Speaker: Alex Gallo, Senior Associate, CSIS, and former Professional Staff Member, House Armed Services Committee

What is the role of the legislative branch in the oversight of the United States’ international relations? How do Senators, Representatives, and their staff impact American diplomacy? Do foreign countries track Congressional legislative activity? What effects can legislative activities, including oversight and legislation, have on U.S. foreign policy?

Reaching a Nuclear Deal: A Conversation on Sanctions and Negotiations

  • Date: November 2, 2017
  • Location: Washington, DC
  • Speaker: Prof. Adam J. Szubin, former Director of the Office of Foreign Assets Control, U.S. Department of the Treasury

What does it take to reach an international nuclear deal? How does diplomacy further multilateral negotiations? What is the spectrum of considerations when planning and conducting an international meeting for negotiations on a divisive issue? Can sanctions influence the outcome of international negotiations?

"Art of Diplomacy Lecture Series" discussion with Ambassador Eric Edelman

  • Date: October 25, 2017
  • Location: Washington, DC
  • Speaker: Eric Edelman, former Ambassador to Finland and Turkey
  • Interviewer: Eliot Cohen, Robert E. Osgood Professor of Strategic Studies at Johns Hopkins SAIS

What challenges and opportunities do diplomats face throughout a career? How can lessons learned from previous crises influence responses to current issues? What is the current state of American diplomacy? What roles do current students have in the future of American diplomatic affairs?

The State of American Diplomacy

  • Date: September 13, 2017
  • Location: Washington, DC
  • Speaker: Antony Blinken, former Deputy Secretary of State
  • Interviewer: Dean Vali Nasr

How does diplomacy further American foreign policy goals around the world and what should its role be in our increasingly connected and social global society? What tools are currently being utilized in American foreign diplomacy? What tools should be? What does smart diplomacy mean today? What role does credibility play in the foreign policy of a nation?

Diplomacy within the United Nations

 

  • Date:  December 8, 2016

  • Location: Bologna, Italy

  • Speaker: Michael Møller, Director-General of the United Nations Office at Geneva 

How does diplomacy within the UN work? How do you anticipate the U.S. election affecting UN priorities over the next four years? What is the future of interstate cooperation via international organizations? Should international organizations like the UN change over time to reflect new balances of power in the international system?

Journalism and Diplomacy

  • Date:  October 27, 2016
  • Location: Bologna, Italy
  • Speakers: FPI Senior Fellow James Mann and David C. Unger

How have current and previous American executives handled diplomacy during their presidencies? Do presidential candidates Clinton and Trump stray from this dynamic? How does one navigate journalism within China? How does one navigate journalism within Washington, DC?

Challenges in Environmental Diplomacy

 

  • Date:  April 18, 2016

  • Location: Washington, DC

  • Speaker: Deputy Assistant Secretary Daniel Reifsnyder

  • Interviewer: Dr. Lynn Wagner ('91, PhD '98)

What are the challenges in conducting environmental diplomacy? How does it differ from the usual practice of U.S. diplomacy? How are historic agreements, such as the recent Paris agreement, negotiated?

Recovering Diplomatic Agility

 

  • Date:  March 8, 2016

  • Location: Washington, DC

  • Speaker: Ambassador Chas Freeman

  • Interviewer: Dr. Daniel Serwer

How does diplomacy further American foreign policy goals around the world and what should its role be in our increasingly connected and social global society? What tools are currently being utilized in American foreign diplomacy? What tools should be utilized?​

Conducting American Foreign Policy in the Middle East & South Asia

 

  • Date: November 17, 2015

  • Location: Washington, DC

  • Speaker: Dean Vali Nasr

  • Interviewer: Ambassador Shirin Tahir-kheli

What is the future of the region? What is the state of American diplomacy today? What have been your experiences as an advisor to senior policymakers and world leaders, and how have they affected your outlook on diplomacy?

Public Diplomacy’s role in U.S. Foreign Policy

 

  • Date: November 3, 2015

  • Location: Washington, DC

  • Speaker: Ambassador Stuart Holliday

  • Interviewer: Dr. Daniel Serwer

How effective is the United States at countering ISIS’s narrative? How can it do better? How does public diplomacy further American foreign policy goals around the world and what should its role be in our increasingly connected and social global society?

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© 2015 The Foreign Policy Institute

The Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS)
The Johns Hopkins University

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