Dealing with Systemic Corruption, a discussion with Dr. Francis Fukuyama

September 19, 2016

How can we effectively engage with corruption? Dr. Fukuyama, Professor of Political Science at Stanford University, Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies & the Mosbacher Director of FSI's Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law, uses a critical lens to address corruption within the development arena, while still engaging with political, cultural, and economic spheres of influence. Dr. Fukuyama uses an interdisciplinary approach to creative analysis.Francis Fukuyama is the Mosbacher director of the Center for Democracy, Development and the Rule of Law (CDDRL) at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, Stanford University. He was previously Bernard Schwartz Professor of International Political Economy at the School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS), John Hopkins University, and Hirst Professor of Public Policy at George Mason University. He has worked at the Rand Corporation and as a member of the Policy Planning Staff of the US Department of State. Francis Fukuyama received his B.A. from Cornell University in classics, and his Ph.D. from Harvard in Political Science. He has written widely on questions concerning democratization and international political economy. His book, The End of History and the Last Man, was published by Free Press in 1992 and has appeared in over twenty foreign editions. His latest book, Political Order and Political Decay: From the Industrial Revolution to the Globalization of Democracy was published in September 2014.

 

 

 

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