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Johns Hopkins SAIS Foreign Policy Institute is pleased to continue "Four Minute Foreign Policy," a series dedicated to providing accessible expert analysis of pressing global developments and starting public conversations on ever-evolving circumstances.

This week, FPI Senior Fellow Cinnamon Dornsife discusses the three most significant misconceptions regarding foreign aid. What should the American public know about aid? Watch now to learn more. Click here to share your thoughts in the comments!

Although the embers have since cooled in one of the most hotly anticipated and closely watched midterm elections in the US, its striking results are likely to leave a profound impact on American politics for the foreseeable future. 

This year’s midterm elections made history by delivering some important firsts. Now there are more than 100 women who hold congressional seats, comprised of 79 Democrats and 29 Republicans. This was an important milestone given the fact that women, despite being rough...

Johns Hopkins SAIS Foreign Policy Institute is pleased to introduce "Four Minute Foreign Policy," a series dedicated to providing accessible expert analysis of pressing global developments and starting public conversations on ever-evolving circumstances.

This week, FPI Senior Fellow Hafed Al Ghwell discusses two key sets of economic partnerships: those between China and the Middle East and those between the United States and the Middle East.

What are the prospects for China's expanding economic en...

An unmistakable sense of despair and gloom accompanies most news reports and literature on the state of affairs in Libya after 2011. The Arab Spring was meant to usher in a period of unprecedented change after decades of notoriously undemocratic leadership across the Middle East and North Africa. Yet, seven years later, there has been very little positive development in terms of transparency, accountability, and inclusivity in the Arab world. No Arab Spring country, however, has fared worse than...

One of Tunisia’s many jobless graduates detonated a home-made suicide bomb in the capital last month. This was not a Daesh attack, it was a desperate and tragic act and an important reminder to politicians and government about what is at stake in this young democracy.

One of the most remarkable achievements of the ill-fated “Arab Spring” was the relative success Tunisia had in transforming its society despite extreme mistrust, heightened polarization and surging terror-related incidents. It was n...

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